Nottinghamshire Insight

Key population facts

Headline statistics (Nottinghamshire):

  • Total population - 817,900
  • Working population (16-64) - 502,500 (61%)
  • Males - 403,000 (49%)
  • Females - 414,800 (51%)
  • Older People (65+) - 167,400 (20.5%)
  • Older People (85+) - 20,900 (2.6%)
  • Children 0-4 - 45,300 (5.5%)
  • Children 5-10 - 58,800 (7%)
  • Children 11-15 - 43,800 (5%)
  • Children 0-17 - 165,500 (20%)

District population figures

  • Ashfield - 126,200
  • Bassetlaw - 116,300
  • Broxtowe - 112,700
  • Gedling - 117,100
  • Mansfield - 108,600
  • Newark and Sherwood - 121,000
  • Rushcliffe - 116,000

Source: ONS Mid-Year Population Estimates 2017

Brief analysis

The statistics presented below provide an overview of trends across Nottinghamshire's population. This information can be used by organisations to support strategic plans and funding applications. They can also be used to communicate your understanding of the needs of the population.

  • The latest estimate of the County's resident population is 817,900 (ONS mid-year estimate 2017).
  • The number of people living in Nottinghamshire increased by 5% between the Census of 2001 and 2011 to 785,800 and is expected to increase by a further 6% to 836,000 by 2021 (ONS 2016-based Resident Population Projections)
  • The main reasons for the population increase from 2016 to 2017 are primarily an increase in net migration of people from both other areas of the UK (internal migration – additional 4,400 persons) and abroad (international migration – additional 1,600 persons), and an increase in life expectancy due to natural change (births minus deaths – additional 391 persons) in the population.
  • Our population is predicted to continue to age over the next 5 years to 2021, with the population aged over 65 expected to increase from 167,400 in 2017 to 178,400 in 2021 (a 6.6% increase). Similarly the population aged over 85 in the county is expected to increase from 20,900 in 2017 to 22,500 in 2021 (an 8% increase) (source: ONS 2016-based Subnational Population Projections).
  • Older people are more likely to experience disability and limiting long-term illnesses, particularly if they provide unpaid care for 50 or more hours per week (JSNA chapter: Carers).
  • More older people in Nottinghamshire are anticipated to live alone; increasing by 41% between 2015 and 2030 (POPPI).
  • Black and minority ethnic (BME) populations are relatively low in Nottinghamshire, 4% compared with 15% nationally. BME populations in Nottinghamshire generally have a younger age profile than the general population (Census 2011).
  • Job Seekers Allowance claimant rate in Nottinghamshire is historically lower than national levels, but in  May 2018 it is 1.1% which is the same as the national figure (NOMIS).
  • For those aged 18-24 years, unemployment rates have been higher than national levels for 8 of the past 9 years and were 1.3% in May 2018, compared with 1.0% nationally (NOMIS).
  • Dominant mosaic groups which make up over half of all households include: E Suburban Stability, H Aspiring Homemakers, F Senior Security, K Modest Traditions, L Transient Renters (Customer Insight).
  • Deprivation levels for Nottinghamshire as a whole are comparable with England. However, within Nottinghamshire there are communities with both some of the highest levels of deprivation in the country and some of the lowest levels of deprivation (IMD 2015).
  • In Nottinghamshire there are 25 areas, known as LSOAs, in the 10% most deprived areas in England. The most deprived areas are concentrated in the districts of Ashfield (9), Mansfield (6), Bassetlaw (6) and Newark & Sherwood (3).
  • People living within the more deprived areas of Nottinghamshire have higher levels of unemployment, lower levels of qualifications, less healthy lifestyle choices and poorer health and wellbeing outcomes compared with those in less deprived areas (JSNA chapter: The People of Nottinghamshire).

Explore data and analysis on Nottinghamshire's population